Permalink: 2014-07-07 by Kai Sun in Blog tags: gomoku renju resource

(Last update: 2016-7-26)

I often recieve emails that ask for gomoku/renju resources, especially for AI design, so I write this article to summerize good resources I know. This page will be maintained and updated in the future. If you find any mistake in this page such as broken links, please contact me.

Reading Materials for AI Design

Competitive Open-source AIs

Open-source GUIs

  • Piskvork by Petr Lastovicka, Czech Republic. It is a GUI that supports Gomocup protocol. A modified version supporting renju rule is developed by Tianyi Hao. (Recommend)

  • Renlib by Frank Arkbo, Sweden. Renlib is one of the best programs which can help you to build a library of renju openings, analysis and played games. (Recommend)

  • Yixin Board by Kai Sun, China. It is a specially designed GUI for Yixin, supporting Yixin protocol. (Recommend)

Protocols for Computer Gomoku/Renju

  • Gomocup Protocol (via files or via stdin/stdout) by Petr Lastovicka, Czech Republic. The protocol is used in Gomocup, and tens of AIs support it.

  • Yixin Protocol by Kai Sun, China. The protocol is derived from Gomocup protocol. Compared with Gomocup protocol, Yixin protocol introduces more commands enabling Yixin to have some new features such as renju rule support.

  • (In Chinese) Botzone Protocol by AI LAB, Peking University. Botzone is an online platform for AI competitions. Since it was updated in 2014 and lost all old data, the old protocol listed here is replaced by a new protocol, and the old one is no longer supported by Botzone's online platform. The old protocol can still be used in the offline AI testing program.

AI Competition and Online Platform

Famous, Competitive, and Interesting AI List

  • Amoeba by Galli Zoltan, Hungary. It uses Monte-Carlo tree search (MCTS) rather than commonly used algorithms such as alpha-beta search. It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Blackstone by Victor Barykin, Russia. It is a commercial software for renju. It is the winner in tournament of the 2nd and the 3rd Renju Computer World Championship (1998, 2000), and the winner in solving problems of the 2nd Renju Computer World Championship (1998).

  • Carbon by Michał Czardybon, Poland. It is the strongest open-source gomoku software. Its original version can be downloaded at Michał Czardybon's Homepage, and its modified version by Petr Lastovicka which supports Gomocup protocol can be obtained from Github.

  • Fiver by Meng Liu, China. A famous classic gomoku engine. It can be downloaded at Nosovsky Japanese Games Home Page.

  • Goro by Victor Barykin, Russia. It is a commercial software for gomoku, the winner of the 6th, the 7th, the 10th, and the 11th Gomocup (2005, 2006, 2009, 2010). It took part in both the first and the second AI vs. Human tournament, playing against one of the best Czech gomoku players in 2006 and 2011. Goro ranked the 5th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Hector for Gomoku by Csaba Jergler, Hungary. It is a general game playing search core module (Hector) along with a compile time connected game specific gomoku module. It took part in Gomocup from 2008 to 2010 and ranked the 9th in the 11th Gomocup (2010). It has been excluded from Gomocup since 2011 because the old version of Hector stopped working and the author did not send the new version to Gomocup. It is not published, so there is no download available.

  • Hewer by Tomas Kubes, Czech Republic. Hewer ranked the 6th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Hgarden by Bingqing Han, China. It took part in the first AI vs. Human tournament, playing against one of the best Czech gomoku players in 2006. Hgarden ranked the 9th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Meijin by Oleg Stepanov, Russia. It played against human players in Moscow Open Tournament, 2000, making it become the first program playing with human players in public competitions.

  • Pacifist by Shuai Han, China. Winner of gomoku AI competition on Botzone hosted by AI LAB, Peking University in Decemeber 2010. It is not published, so there is no download available.

  • Pela by Petr Lastovicka, Czech Republic. Pela was the winner of the Microsoft gomoku tournament. It was once the strongest open-source gomoku engines before Carbon was ported to support Gomocup protocol. It is one of the best known strong open-source gomoku engines. It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Pisq by Martin Petricek, Czech Republic. It is the winner of the 1st and the 2nd Gomocup (2000, 2001). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Onix by Janos Wagner and Istvan Virag, Hungary. It is the winner of the 1st Hungarian Computer Go-Moku Open Tournament, 2005. Onix ranked the 7th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). Onix can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Renjusolver by Xiangdong Wen. It is a commercial software for both gomoku and renju. It is the winner in solving problems of the 4th Renju Computer World Championship, 2004. It took part in the second AI vs. Human tournament, playing against one of the best Czech gomoku players in 2011. Renjusolver ranked the 2nd in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • SlowRenju by Tianyi Hao, China. It is a free software supporting multiple platforms, and its Android version is the strongest free gomoku and renju AIs for Andorid. SlowRenju ranked the 3rd in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Super by Tongxiang Zhang, China. It is the winner in solving problems of the 3rd Renju Computer World Championship (2000).

  • Swine by Jirka Fontan, Czech Republic. It is the winner of the 4th and the 5th Gomocup (2003, 2004). It took part in the second AI vs. Human tournament, playing against one of the best Czech gomoku players in 2011. Swine ranked the 8th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Tito by Andrej Tokarjev, Hungary. It is the winner of the 8th, the 9th, and 12th Gomocup (2007, 2008, 2011). It took part in both the first and the second AI vs. Human tournament, playing against one of the best Czech gomoku players in 2006 and 2011. Tito ranked the 4th in the 17th Gomocup (2016). It can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Trunkat by Jiri Trunkat. It is the winner of the 3rd Gomocup (2002). Trunkat can be downloaded at Gomocup.org.

  • Tyson by Gabor Takacs, Hungary. It is winner of the 2nd Hungarian Computer Go-Moku Open Tournament, 2005. It is not published, so there is no download available.

  • Vertex by Artyom Shaposhnikov and Alexander Nosovsky, Russia. It is the winner of the 1st Renju Computer World Championship, 1991. There is no download available.

  • Victoria by V. Allis and L Schoenmaker, Netherlands. It is the first program which is bound to win if it moves first for both freestyle and standard gomoku without modern opening rules. It is the winner of gomoku in the 4th Computer Olympiad. Victoria is not published, so there is no download available. Refer to Allis's thesis for more information.

  • Yixin by Kai Sun, China. It is a free software for both gomoku and renju. It is the winner of the 13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, and 17th Gomocup (2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016).

Other Useful Software

  • RenArtist by Yusuke Okuno, Japan. It gives a good solution about making databases and publish them directly on the web.

  • Gomoku Terminator by Shanshan Liu, China. It is a free software which is bound to win if it moves first for freestyle gomoku without modern opening rules.

Rules and Variations

  • Prepared Balanced Opening is the most popular opening rule in computer gomoku. It is used by both Hungarian Computer Go-Moku Open Tournament and Gomocup.

Alt text

(3 prepared balanced openings used in the 15th Gomocup (provided by Alexander Bogatirev, manager of Team Russia online, member of Gomoku Committee RIF, 2014))

  • Gomoku swap2 is an opening rule for gomoku. The rule is as follows: (1) The first player puts 2 black and 1 white stones anywhere on the board; (2) The second player has 3 options: a. stay with white; b. swap; c. put 2 more stones and let the opponent choose the colour.

  • RIF opening rule is an opening rule for renju adopted by Renju International Federation in 1996.

  • Yamaguchi opening rule is an opening rule for renju developed by Japanese player Yusui Yamaguchi.

  • Swap after first move is an opening rule for gomoku. The rule is as follows. (1) The first player puts 1 black stone anywhere on the board; (2) The second player has 2 options: a. stay with white; b. swap.

  • Pente is a strategy board game for two or more players similar to gomoku/renju.

  • Connect 6 is a two-player strategy game similar to gomoku/renju.

Other Useful Links